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20121124
20121124
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
resources in a way that makes the networks run well, i think if you look back at the hurricane katrina recommendations, they were for voluntary, flexible framework. we did not disagree with the goal of the fcc to keep the networks running. that is in every carrier's best interest. it is how you go about doing that. for us, when you look a storm of this magnitude, is having the ability to react, move assets around. carriers have to put in thousands of feet of cables to drag cables of to the rooftops to power generators so that we could have cell sites working. >> let's go back to katrina in 2005. what investment have wireless companies done to improve the reliability? >> in every instance possible, putting in backup power. we put towers in on church steeples, on the side of buildings in major metropolitan areas. in closets within buildings. it becomes difficult in certain areas to have backup power. the carriers try to put in batteries were the cannot put in generators. where they can put in generators, the put in as much fuel as allowed. when you are working with building codes or resi
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
at the city of the site of a client. that city was new orleans. this was a few weeks after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to
9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, our pilots are trained, we have the gary that's necessa
to a better night's sleep ♪ >>. >> bill: remember the cuban missile crisis, 9/11, katrina, those were events that felt like the world were coming. there are people that are worried about other kinds of doomsdays and they plan on surviving. >> it looks like in has been another series of attacks, cyber attacks on united states banks. >> bill: recent cyber attacks could have doomsday style consequences. that has our government concerned. >> attackers could also seek to disable or degrade critical military systems and communication networks. collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> we have an insane regime in iran run by people who are psychotic who may get the nuclear weaponry to act on their insane thoughts. that means we could have a nuclear holocaust. >> what we depict on our show they have a variety they are concerned about. everything from tsunami to a nuclear blast. >> a koe executive producer of doomsday preppers. >> there are three touch stones. first touch stone is 9/11. second touch stone is destruction of american cities which is katrina. third to
. >> very interesting. i have a question, both lewis and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply
, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the things as a command and control tool that
might remember them from last week. in 2005, think back to hurricane katrina. in 2001, president bush appointed joseph, the chief of staff in texas and the 2000 campaign manager, but no emergency management experience. under president bush, the number of political appointees went from 27-38. he brought in michael brown, his college roommate. now in 2003, michael brown took over fema. he also had no previous emergency experience, the u.s. commission of the international an arabian horse association which was his qualification. hurricane katrina hits new orleans, brown took control of the relief effort, but it was a disaster both literally and figuratively. you may remember president bush said, you're doing a heck of a job. it became clear that he could not handle it, and he was replaced by the coast guard, a career professional that handle the and a good job. of course, the katrina disaster was not all brown's fault. the appointment is an illustration of the problem, an increasing number of appointees, the lack of emergency management experience, layers of political appointees over car
/11, katrina? in these uncertain times there are people worried about other kinds of doomsdays and they plan on surviving. >> it looks like another series of attacks, cyber attacks on major united states banks. >> recent cyber attacks on large financial institutions could have doomsday-style consequences. that has our government concerned. >> attackers could also seek to disable or degrade, critical military systems and communication networks. >> collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> we have an insane regime in iran run by people who are psychotic, who may get the nuclear weaponry to act on their insane thoughts. that means we could have a nuclear holocaust. >> the -- we have disaster scenarios from tsunami, earthquake, nuclear blast. >> alan madison co-executive producer of doomsday preppers, a reality program on national geographic tuesday nights. >> there are three touchstones for many preppers in terms of events that happened in our history the first is 9/11 the second is destruct of american city, which is katrina and the third i hear them talking
are the first major u.s. city to (inaudible) post katrina where he saw firsthand where a critical role these systems played in the city's recovery. i am honored to chair the council because i feel it's crucial that the public sector work side by side with our private sector partners to do everything we can today to ensure we will meet the needs of our residents in the days, weeks and years after a disaster. the objective of the lifeline council are to develop and improve collaboration in the city and county across regions regularly -- to develop and improve collaboration in the city and across the region by regularly convening a group of senior level operation officers of local and regional life line providers, understanding intersystem dependencies of enhancing planning, restoration and reconstruction, share information about the recovery plans and priorities and establish coordination process for life lines restoration and recovery following a major disaster. i'm going to go back to the last slide and just say today's conversation i want to focus around the specific challenges that
december katrina, descartes, who developed a different view of pain .. he thought of pain as a biological process and drew this wonderful drawing of a young boy being burnt. his toes being injured, and finers were carrying the information about injury directly from the toe into the brain, although the details of this model are not what we view as the pain process the general idea that it is a biological process is the current view. but the question is, what is the nature of the biological process. it is remarkable to realize that until 20 years ago, we did not have a good understanding until -- of the nature of the biological process involved. people thought that pain was very different from all of the instrumentalities, for each modality you have different receptors like rods and cones in the rhett na, you have old factory receptors old factory receptors in the nose .. each one has a private line, receptors specific to it and nerve fibers that lead to it. >> rose: hear, feel, touch. >> exactly, with pain people thought that it may not have a system of its own, that it hijacks other syste
plummeted. it washurricane katrina times, up $15, and now it's down torina about $2. it's so cheap and plentiful, but people don't want to sort of embrace the idea this is good for the environment because it is, after all, a fossil fuel.ue. >> it is.t 's not the end of the solution to climate change, but, listen, we have triedor 20 years witho kiota and the e.u. wanted to dod goo.d. we -- i'm from -- we paid $20 billion or $30 billion to cut emissions, and you've done it for free, actually, made moneyyu doing it because you got cheaper energy. that's theth way forward. also, for china and india and everyone else. melissa: proponents of solar and wind don't want to hear is while fracking has been profitable, it's helped the environment, but at the same time, you look at things, like, a big story from w wyoming, why theyh drill, anddrl there's a well that is contaminated one way or the other, and seems like in the repos dealing with this and the neighbors in the neighborhood are saying, and s this is pavilion, wyoming, it's, a result of theracking nearby, and that's a case they point
infrastructure. in 2005, hurricane katrina destroyed parts of new orleans. now they have a $14.6 billion flood protection system. in 2007, this bridge in minneapolis collapsed. that bridge was rebuilt but many of our nation's bridges are still in a sorry state. it takes extraordinary events for us to upgrade our infrastructure. i spoke to infrastructure enthusiast and colleague fareed zakaria here on cnn. when we talk about infrastructure projects, there are many people in this country who feel it is stimulus, government spending, ineffective, it's decorated with sorts of favors for everybody and pork. how do you convince people that there's a way to spend that $2.2 trillion that the american society of civil engineers says we need to spend and get a payback? >> actually a very smart idea about how to do it. it was co-sponsored by john kerry and kay bailey hutchison is create a infrastructure bank. have the federal government seed it with capital but have private sector money. have the projectsawarded by a board, a group of technical experts that evaluate the projects on their merit rather tha
hurricane katrina. now he wants to help people in the northeast. drew brees and his wife brittany told cbs they formed the drew brees foundation committing $1 million to help with super storm sandy relief efforts. that matches the $1 million pledge the nfl and players made to the red cross just after sandy. >>> congressman jesse jackson jr. is resigning after dealing with bipolar disorder and other health problems for nearly a year. he said wednesday he needs to spend time getting better. he's been away from d.c. for most of the year. jackson is also being investigated for possibly trying to get president obama's old senate seat in exchange for fundraising. he has denied doing anything wrong. >>> we know you spend the first part of your saturday and sunday right here on hln but what's are you up to? we want to see what weekends in america look like in your hometown. kimberly captured this sweet moment in colorado springs, colorado. look at the mama and her fawn. she says she's thankful for photo ops like this. deer had been walking through her front yard on a daily basis. do you have a pho
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)